• The portrait is drawn on the panel with black, waterproof, india ink. A wash of ultramarine blue is loosely applied to the background to approximate the final color.

  • All Flesh tones are covered with a mixture of terra verde mixed with a little bit of titanium white.

  • A warmish green called verdaccio is applied thinly to all shadow areas. This turns the shadows deeper, setting up contrasts of warm and cool greens.

  • This step the Medieval artist’s called ‘putting the apple in the cheeks’. A thin glaze of vermilion or cadmium red light is applied to all facial areas where bone or cartilage is close to the skin (ie., areas where the flesh appears pink such as the cheeks, tip of the nose, ears and chin).

  • 5 values of pinkish flesh tones are mixed using cad red light, a bit of cad yellow light and titanium white.

  • The pink tones are applied thinly and transparently over the flesh areas allowing the green under painting to show through in areas where the skin tones are more neutrally colored.

  • As more translucent strokes of pink are applied, the harsh reds begin to soften and the green becomes less intense.

  • More flesh tones are applied, gradually eliminating most of the green tone, allowing it only to influence the surface skin color.

  • Tonal transitions and highlights are well established.

  • Flesh tones are finished. Warm and cool glazes are applied to the hair.

  • The finished portrait.